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to "washington journal" on this wednesday, march 16, 2011. the latest from japan -- "the new york times" headline -- "second reactor may have ruptured." first, let's start with the war in afghanistan. do you think it is worth fighting? a "the washington post" abc news poll says 2/3 of americans say it is not. the numbers -- we also have a line set up for active duty military. you can also e-mail us and we are on twitter. we will read your tweets on the air this morning. this is the story in "the washington post" yesterday looking at the war in afghanistan. "the afghan war is not worth fighting, most in the u.s. say." host: what do you think? is the war in afghanistan worth fighting? do you think it has been productive so far? if you think this time for a pullout? fairfax, virginia. jack joins us. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a comment about the war and one other comment. i do not think it is worth fighting. we're spending $2 billion per week and countless companies are just taking this money. it cannot be accounted for. that is why i think the republicans are all four wards because t
been talked -- touched by the magnitude until this disaster are closely following the events in japan and the repercussions in this country and in many other countries. before we begin, i would like to offer my sincere condolences to all of those who have been affected by the earthquake and the tsunami in japan. our hearts go out to all lead in dealing with the aftermath of these natural disasters. we are mindful of a long and difficult road they will face in recovering. we know the people of japan are resilience and strong and we have every confidence that they will come through this difficult time and move forward with resolved to rebuild their vibrant country. i believe i speak for all americans when i say that we stand together with the people of japan at this most difficult and challenging time. the nrc is a relatively small agency. we play a critical role in protecting american people and the environment when it comes to the use of nuclear materials. we have our inspectors to work full time as every nuclear plant in the country and we are proud to have world top scientists, engi
. immediately you get the question, you design against those, but look at japan. if you had an earthquake with a magnitude of nine, how does one answer that question? you could always have and 9.5 occur. is there a rational way of addressing that? >> my explanation is one i know you understand. we look that up faults around the u.s. and have that information's. look at the historical record, but that the maximum earthquake, and with everything we do, we add margins, but we also looked at the specific location in relation to the fault. we considered the kinds of soil and rock formations between the fault location and the site, and analysis to see the ground motion that would actually be seen at the site. and we design for an earthquake of a certain size. i am falling into the trap of saying of a certain size, of the ground motion of a certain magnitude. having said that, with all these other things, severe accident management guideline, the b five b procedures, we have procedures and equipment in place that says, even if we were wrong and the plant suffered this serious event, we have in f
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
him. so now he is in something -- like crabs coming out of japan, being pulled down by everyone. what is right? what is wrong? president bush was too fast to go into war. they say he is too slow. he is going to take his time to see if he is right and do the right thing by people, not just black people, ever ready. this man loves everybody. you got white people that created this mess and that is coming down on him like he did it. something is wrong with this world. we see things going on and look at it in an abstract way. was notthis war started by president obama. we did not start having money shortage from president obama. he is the first black african american president. you white people sitting around a pole and give your opinion about things. -- around tables and give your opinions about things. you always have done best. this. guehost: our thanks to al- jazeera that is showing us what is going on in libya. from "the new york times", the allies open the air assault on gaddafi forces. residents interviewed. there was heavy fighting and the city center and pro-gaddafi snipers could
this morning of some of the aftermath of the tsunami in japan. you can see the flooding and fighters. let me show you a couple of other pictures. this is from china. look at the floating vehicles submerged and the flooded streets in the miyagi region of japan. this is what it was like for people in a bookstore in a japanese city as the ceiling started to fall in the aftermath of the earthquake. big, international story affecting millions of people on the pacific rim and lots of news coverage will be coming out as the death tolls become clear and also the damage. we are going to talk national politics today and we want to move to wisconsin. with the union vote in the assembly, the legislation is now sent to the governor for a signature. a reporter for "the wisconsin state journal" is on the phone with us. tell us about what the mood was like inside the chamber as the legislation passed. guest: hostile. there was about an hour or two of debate yesterday. the republicans called off debate and voted as they filed out of the chamber. their democratic colleagues, along with some protesters shouted
this month. usa today has a story about the situation in japan growing and have an impact here in the united states. we will talk about exports and imports and how this plays into japan later on in the program. before our last phone call, i want to show you what colonel gaddafi had to say late yesterday evening about the situation in libya. >> all the muslim armies have to take part in this battle against the crusaders. their protest all over the world to help you come in asia, and africa, in america, in europe. they are people against their own leaders. we will been -- we will win, we will be victorious, we will not surrender. host: an independent in north carolina, your the last phone call. what do you think? caller: thank god for c-span and. i am from south carolina, and only heard it once, our leaders met behind closed doors, which is illegal. i keep hearing about going to cut, going to cut. i walked into my nearby pharmacy and they didn't know and i did not know that my medicaid had been cut. and they were not -- i'm a diabetic with kidney failure, but i could not get my insulin pills o
come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. a lot of it is, i feel compelled to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a really race. -- relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence to rivera and you were fantastic. " -- who were there and who worked fantast
security council. and to add additional at-on sanctions from our partners, including the e.u., japan, and others. when you are trying to sanction iran, no matter how powerful you are and how much we can do, it is imperative that we get the international community to support it. otherwise, there is too much leakage. we have limited that, and i feel strongly that we are making an impact. >> thank you, and i request written responses that you offered to the questions that you are not able to answer because i have so many, including the deposition of the libyan officials, which is so timely. my good friend, the ranking member. >> i want to commend my colleagues on the committee the speech that secretary clinton gave in addition to her estimate -- excellent testimony, but yesterday, going to the human rights council, where she discussed libya, iran, and other issues come up quite a remarkable presentation, particularly in pointing out ypocrisy of ouriran's condemnations of libya. i would like asked -- try to get into issues in this short time. one, the israeli-palestinian process. the que
also non-governmental organizations, look at the regulatory commissions. i think japan is quite a democratic country. it will take awhile to get all the information out of it. in this country, active citizen participation -- go to nuclear regulatory commission hearings. you can comment on all kinds of things. i recently commented on an n.r.c. regulations and rules. it is possible, but i think you have to be vigilant. host: grace writes to us on twitter asking about a ban on nuclear power plants. sharon squassoni, thank you so much for joining us this morning. she is the program director for proliferation prevention at the center for strategic & international studies. let's go now to the floor of the house of representatives, where the session is getting underway. thanks for joining us today. ker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., march 16, 2011. i hereby appoint the honorable renee ellmers to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of janua
friend and ally japan. i spoke with members of the foreign affairs and ministry of justice regarding the fact that japan has become a destination country, a haven for international child abductions. our foreign service officers and consul general were extremely sympathetic. at least 171 children and 131 broken hearted parents are worried sick and have no access to see their children. all of us want japan to sign the hague convention on international child deduction. that treaty will not solve the current cases. they stand at great risk of being left behind a second time. what is the administration's plan to resolve the current cases? on at least five occasions, president obama has met with them. did he raise the issue of those children and their left behind parents? since 1979, brothers and sisters have been illegal in china as part of the bar. one child per couple policy. for over 30 years, the you and public relations -- the u.n. population fund has supported and celebrated the mass of crimes against humanity. the facts are uncontested. any chinese or to that woman without -- or ti
an impression, barbara, about how news of japan sinks into one of the most seismically active country in the world? it's a good question. a lot of my iranian friends have been very afraid about the brashear. -- brashear reactor. i had one friend tell me it's such a hodgepodge of technology. the germans started it in the 1970's and you have chinese bits, russian bits that they're afraid if you plug it in you're afraid the whole thing's beginning to to blow up anyway. now you have japan. it's a very cautionary tale for the iranians. you notice brashear as that -- has not opened. i would bet that it's going to be a while before that reactor starts up if it ever does and if they don't have a functioning nuclear power plant, why do they need all these lower enriched uniform for? -- uranium for? that's in favor as well as all the other problems that's going on, the assassinations of nuclear scientists and so on. it definitely could be a factor in suggesting that they might slow down. i don't think they're going to give up their determination to have a pro
aspiration of the iranians for a long time. do you had the impression, barbara, how news of japan at that didn't one of the most seismically active countries in the world? >> a lot my iranian friends have been wary of the it bashir reactor opening. the german started in the 1970's, and you have chinese and russians, but if you plug it into the whole thing will blow up anyway. and now you have had japan. it is a very cautionary tale for the iranians. bashir has not opened. there were problems with the fuel rods, some say sabotage of the pumps. i think it will be awhile before the reactor starts up, if it ever does. if they do not have a functioning power plant, what did they mine all of the -- in range all the or uranium for? -- what did dave enrich all of the uranium for? it could be a factor in projecting that they might slow down. i do not think they will give up their determination on those who have a program and to say that they have a right to the program. that as a nationalistic issue. they will not go away. >> that is a lesson not just for iran but for the entire middle eas
point. you recently come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. -- a that is not enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. it costs a lot to send you and a group of people overseas. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence who were there and who were fan
is and the melting nuclear melting in japan shows how perilous our dependence on nuclear power is and they underscore our failure to have a broad based energy portfolio and our failure to have a rational look at our energy usage. mr. russo, - to set prices are determined by supply and demand globally, and several of you have said that sort of thing. let me ask i guess the first mr. newell, what is the scale and let's put it in perspective here of possible short term energy production. i mean, suppose there were a lot more leases for offshore drilling released in the last couple of years to hear the curious oppose or even a in the drilling on private land. what is the scale of the increase in production we might achieve compared to what opec can do by turning defaults up and down in the short term? >> welcome there is a considerable lag in the increased access resources and an expiration and the element and the ultimate protection of the resources so there's an important issue would return to the time scale which i think you mentioned in the short run to respond to the immediate impact send crude oil
blood on his hands. host: thank you. in "usa today" this morning "in japan, nuclear water source is far from clear." host: back to the phones. henderson, kentucky on the line for independents. robert, you are on the "washington journal." caller: good morning. blessed morning to all. host: robert, turn down your television. that will help out a lot. caller: 1 second. i have it right here. host: what do you think about the u.s. involvement and should it involve regime change? caller: as a former moslem, i think it is absolutely disgraceful for the united states of america to be trying to change in regime they are not responsible for. you cannot go around trying to govern the world. the united states is not responsible for the libyan people. they have selected muammar gaddafi as their leader. america has a history of ignoring brutality tyrannical type of behavior around the world. however, when it seems to involve muslims or persons of color, america turns the other cheek. she loves the oil out of libya. she loves to suck the oil out of nigeria. the berlin conference is a historical docume
caused by the catastrophe there. it is something that japan with assistance from the world committee can achieve. it is important to recognize that we come into this challenge in the world economy in a much stronger position that we have been. you see much more confidence, i think testified here and around the world, and the resilience in the process of expansion we see under way. we want to sustain that. and they should be our focus and attention. >> i am concerned because we see toshiba and toyota stopping production. illus like we have a systemic shortage of power in japan that will cripple large publicly traded companies in being able to maintain production. >> again, there are a lot of things to be concerned about in the world. it is important that we watch this carefully. very hard to judge at this stage what will be the magnitude of the short-term cost of production output there. our focus will be on trying to help them make sure they can help meet the humanitarian challenge in the reconstruction challenge. i think it can be reasonably confident they will be able to do that. >> se
afghanistan by the end of the year. follow the house live, here on c-span. >> earlier today, japan's prime minister called the damage from the earthquake the most severe challenge the nation has faced since world war ii. friday's disasters damage a series of nuclear reactors, particularly -- potentially sending one to a personal -- a partial meltdown. this statement is about 10 minutes. >> i would like to express my deepest sympathy to those who have been affected by the quake, and also in the disaster stricken areas, as well as to the people of japan who are in a very difficult situation. people remain very calm, and i would like to express my deepest gratitude as well as my respect to all those who are behaving very calmly. boeing yesterday, today we worked very hard to rescue people, and so far, the self- defense force as well as police and firefighters and maritime are able to save about 12,000 people. i would like to explain about the rescue efforts. the self-defense forces, all of the forces have mobilized 50,000 people, and they are to be doubled to 100,000, and the police officers,
on the i live like to do offer my sincere condolences to the people of japan as they recover from one of the first national disasters in their history. japan has been a stalwart partner in afghanistan, an important contributor to the nation there. >> if i could interrupt you for a minute. thank you for doing that. >> thank you. it is the assessment that the momentum achieved by the taller than it since 2005 has been arrested and much of the country and reversed in a number of areas. it is also fragile and reversible. it is clear that much difficult work lies ahead with our partners to solidify and expand our games in the spring offensive. the achievements in 2013 -- in 2010 have allowed the joint nato -- the achievements are also very important. i've prepared to provide recommendations to president obama for commencement of the drawdown of the u.s. search forces in july. it has put us on the right path. afghan forces are in the lead by the end of 2014. bin smmit. the achievements of 2010 and early 2011 have been enabled by a determined effort to get the inputs right united states and
journal" discusses the nuclear situation in japan. the u.s. keeps quiet over radiation, is the headline. the head of the nuclear commission will be our guest on our newsmakers program. you can watch it tomorrow starting at 10:00. he will take questions from reporters concerning what is going on. that program is 10:00 tomorrow morning in the 6:00 tomorrow evening on c-span. he will talk about the latest stemming from what is going on in japan. maryland, republican line. caller: i think we are being hypocrites. we say nothing about israel. them killing innocent palestinian men, women, and children. we give them billions of dollars and ask them to stop building settlements. they tell us to go to hell. i think we are doing a good thing to put more pressure on gaddafi. host: are you comfortable with the level of involvement right now? caller: yes. host: ohio, democrats line. caller: what are we going to do if they knock down some of our pilots? are we going to see water bordering over there? what will we do with collateral damage? i have no idea on how i would answer my own question. i am th
to take resources away from that to help the effort to analyze what happened in japan the decisions on the new reactors are still some time away. right now they're getting public comment. that will take a few months to get all of those comments in. then we will begin the process of reviewing them. that is still several months away. i am not sure exactly how we will balance our resources. mother nature has thrown a hideous tons of the japanese, bigger than their civil a nuclear engineers and licensing authority's anticipated. how can we be confident -- not that we are likely to say tsunami -- how can we be confident that we won't have a hurricane, earthquake and other natural phenomenon that is bigger than the biggest thing you have budgeted for it? guest: the way we think about it is we come up with what we think is the maximum natural phenomenon that we expect to occur and we designed these facilities around that with a little bit extra margin because we now there are some things we don't know. we recognize there may things we had not envisioned or thought about. we have establishe
an argument. >> that's a good point, that's a good point. you have recently come back from a trip to japan. we are now here in washington talking as we tape this. but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas, and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer "because it was a great story," is not enough. why did you make the trip? you have so many responsibilities that come into a decision. why, for example, did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say is a science and a theory. it is not. a lot of it is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i cover that tsunami in indonesia and east asia, but i felt that that was the story that i had to experience tangibly, and to see. as we said, this incredible constellation of the disasters. i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there, and part of being an anchor, as you know, is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. is and it -- isn't it don hewitt who coined this term, "anchor"? a
it the largest public debt in japan hit a wall. the japanese debt is about double the size of its $5 trillion economy. it is not a question of whether they are too big to fail. many of the photographs have become part of the picture two weeks after the earthquake and tsunami struck japan. the crisis in japan and the impact on global economics. springfield, ill., back to your calls, republicans only, what issues will define the gop primary next year? good morning. caller: i think the biggest issue is for whoever the candidate or is is for them to espouse conservative values. if they are very conservative in their policy or the programs that they put forth, that will attract a lot of the common americans whether they are democrats or republicans or independents. i think most americans espousing those views. to me, it will be about conservatism and pocketbook issues. it will be about whether or not they feel they are better off than they were four years ago. i don't see that happening. i think there is a malaise and a true conservative candidate will be able to marshal the forces to be elected i
additional sanctions, the european union has additional sanctions, other countries like japan, korea, etc., have added on sanctions, to get some of our partners to follow sanctions that are not u.n. sanctions has been challenging. but we are at it every single day and we will keep it up. there will be more to report to you in the near future. >> thank you for that. i just hope that you can submit for the record how many are under review and what is the 180-day tolling period look like. >> thank you. >> good morning, madame. >> good morning. >> i want to talk with you about the national debt. in is a national issue an regards to national security. how does it affect our ability to affect events around the world? >> i think it is an incredibly important issue. i clearly agree that the united states must be strong at home in order to maintain our strength abroad. at the core of our strength is our economic strength. i am well aware, having sat for you and know sitting for eight years, the necessity to take action to begin to rein in our debt and, particularly, our indebtedness to foreign cou
to make an argument. >> a good point. recently come back from a trip to japan. and we are now here in washington talking as we tape this, but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, it is not enough. why do you make the trip? you have seven responsibilities they cut into a decision, because it costs a lot to send you and a lot of people overseas. why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say it was a science. it's not. a lot of this is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i covered the tsunami in indonesia and southeast asia, but i felt that that was a story that i had to experience tangibly and to see. and as we said, this incredible constellation of disasters. and i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. isn't it don hewitt and coined the term anchor
attention from the historic changes in the middle east and north africa to the tragedy unfolding in japan. as i often say, we have to deal with both the urgent and the important at the same time. with president obama departing for resilience in just a few hours, -- for brazilia and just a few hours, this is the time to consider another important part of the world. the president's trip coincides with the anniversary of a major milestone in hemispheric relations. 50 years ago, president kennedy launched the alliance for progress, pledging that the united states would join with latin american leaders to address head-on a development challenge that was, as he put it, staggering in its dimensions. he understood that our failure to tackle poverty and inequality in latin america could tear the social fabric and undercut democracy's prospects throughout the hemisphere. president kennedy announced the alliance here in washington to an audience of latin american ambassadors at the white house. president obama will mark this anniversary in latin america. i think that is fitting. too few americans ha
sympathy for the people of japan due to the massive earthquake and tsunami. but i was grateful to learn last week at the rotary club that the rotary foundation is taking direct action. special assistant bill walker of the second district office is a dedicated rotarian. the rotary japan and disaster fund has been established for donations online worldwide. the international president of missouri is promoting the people assistance in the best tradition with his creed, building communities, bridging continents. japan is a leading rotary nation and it is fitting the incoming r.i. president nominee to continue the relief assistance of the club of japan. as a rotarian, i appreciate the role worldwide with hundreds of new clubs in formerly communist countries who are making a difference with service above self. as with polio plus, rotarians can achieve humanitarian assistance which creates worldwide records for effectiveness. in conclusion, god bless our troops, we will never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the cha
places like helmand province, baghdad, those in japan helping the people recover from >> at a town hall meeting earlier today, president obama said that u.s. involvement in libya would be limited in both time and scope. the president will speak to the nation about libya and washington d.c. later today. we will have that live at 7:30 eastern and take your calls. the senate is back from their spring recess this afternoon. members gavel then to talk about a technology bill. more on that tomorrow on the legislation. also, a u.s. district court judicial nomination a vote on the nomination is expected shortly in the senate. in the house returns tomorrow for legislative and business a bill that would temporarily extend the airport programs. the federal aviation commission programs bill. >> tonight, perspectives on the deal between at&t and t-mobile. and from the communications workers of america and consumers union's discuss the impact on the wireless industry, what the deal faces in the justice department and the potential impact on consumers. >> on saturday, the former u.s. ambassador t
.n. world food program has delivered so far $2 million worth of aid to japan, but the agency said today that japan still needs much more temporary shelter. sanitation help and health equipment. finally, another member of the britain house of commons has been sentenced to prison for making fraudulent expense -- fraudulent expense claims. jim divine has been sent to prison for filing bogus invoices for cleaning and printing work, totaling more than $13,000. a total of three to 92 current and former british legislators have been ordered to pay a total of 1.1 million pounds and expenses. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is open quote washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house. weeknights coming congressional hearings and policy forums. also, supreme court oral arguments. on the weekend, see our signature programs. on saturday, "the communicator's." on sunday, "newsmakers." you can also watch our program at c-span.org, and it is searchable in our c-span video li
are indispensible in the new world too. so your growing engagement with key countries in the region like japan, india, south korea and indonesia, is enormously welcomed. we will work closely with you to strengthen the fabric of these relationships and underpin regional stability. strengthening regional institutions so that the countries that the asia-pacific increasingly manage the friction of a growing and changing asia-pacific. that's why your nation's decision to join the east asia summit is such good news. the summit brings the leaders of the region's major powers together and has a mandate to deal with the whole range of economic, political and security issues our countries face. our relationship is evolving to meet these new challenges. from defense and intelligence to diplomacy and trade. australia and the south with south korea and japan to the north form real asian-pacific relationships with the united states. regional stability. an alliance which was strong in the cold war, an alliance which is strong in the new world. in both of our countries, true friends stick together. our nation
about the scintillation at japan's failing to nuclear power plant. live coverage from the senate in the tree committee began said 10:00 a.m. eastern. over on c-span3, us senate hearing on protecting the civil rights of muslim americans. witnesses include an official from the justice the apartment. that also stars at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> experience american history on c-span3. 48 hours of people events telling the american story. here first-person accounts for people who have shaped modern america on "oral histories." history writers and travel to important battle skills and learn about keep figures and events that should be aired during the 100th the 150th anniversary of the civil war. professor spilled into america's past during lectures and history. join curators and the story behind the scene and museum exhibits on american artifacts. the presidency, focusing on policies and legacies, as told to historic speeches and personal insights from administration officials and experts. american history tv on c-span3, all we can, every weekend. get our complete schedule online and sig
enemies or our competitors -- china, japan, and the tyrants in the middle east. there is no end in sight, and the president's own budget, he has got to in years of deficit. he will add more to the national debt in his four years than all presidents or him combine. what is washington doing? thank god for the tea party. i noticed -- [applause] thank god for paul ryan and the republican party and steve king and others. washington is not about leadership. washington is not about the people. washington is about money and reelection. had he figured it out? -- have you figured it out? i will tell you a story, the nation is hurting, and washington, d.c., is a boom town. how does that grab you? i tell you what they are addicted to. special interest money, all i want is access money, wall street money, to be to fail money. union money, the pac money, pac money back money, corporate money, a pharmaceutical money, all subsidy money, ethanol subsidy money, insurance money, tort reform money. the system is institutionally corrupt. where are the people? they're left that. i go to washington once every
. japan. turkey, a special and interesting possibility given its role in the region and its current involvement in afghanistan. perhaps saudi arabia and perhaps others. we are not prescriptive with respect to that. their role would be initially to work closely with the facilitator to help in fact cement ties and bring forward the kind of agreements that are absolutely necessary to see the inner afghan part of the process prosper. the their second role and it will evolve in our view over time to also consult together and negotiate to undertake hollen what with the international community and particularly the region will support what is that the afghans can agree, support what the afghans would like with result -- respect to their future status in the region and the world, is it neutrality or something else? also make commitments themselves on critical questions regarding the future of afghanistan. centrally continued economic assistance and wherever required in the future of the government, security and assistance to help against any of surgeons -- resurgence of al qaeda. as well as
in japan. members will hear from the head of our nuclear regulatory commission, 10:00 a.m. eastern. although later in the day, live on c-span3 8:45 eastern, congressional correspondents dinner. rand paul and anthony wiener of new york, and others. >> for more than a quarter decades, the libyan people have been ruled by a tyrant. muammar gaddafi. he is denied his people's freedom, exploited their wealth, murdered opponents at home and abroad, and terrorize innocent people around the world. >> follow what key leaders are saying about libya and how the process unfolded from the president and other administration officials, from the house and senate floor, and other leaders around the world, all on line at the c-span video library board search, watch, click, and share any time. >> in libya tuesday, the u.s. struck a missile storage facility near tripoli will forces loyal to muammar gaddafi the drove back rebels near his home town. in london, foreign ministers and representatives of more than 40 countries met to discuss how to deal with libya. after that meeting, british foreign secreta
countries -- japan and brides.rea to importwho import those countries do not have a disparity. what does it mean? i do not know what it means, but i think we have jump to conclusions quite a bit. maybe in the end it will pan out some kind of impact. it is a moral issue, and i think that is why people are attracted to it. we wanted to be a security issue, but i think it may not be at all. >> a gentleman over here, and then we will work down to the front >t. nk you.6nank richard and i have known each other for many years. in that report, youth have become a major factor. we have looked at the current distribution of youth in the muslim majority countries, africa, europe, and the middle east. this is going to increase further to 30% in the next few years. with the exception of few countries, the rates have declined substantially. most of that country's will increase further. i would like to shift from africa to tunisia. 28% of people are youth, a tiny population compared to the region i come from, south asia. in we are about 180 million people in pakistan. that means about 60 million young
in japan. i have one friend tell me that there's such a hodgepodge of technology. the germans started it in the 1970's. then the japanese took it. they are afraid that if people give in, it will blow up. -- they're afraid that, if you plug it in, it will blow up. some people have suggested there is seven times at the pumps. i think there will be a while because that reactor dissolves if it ever does. if they do not have a power plant, what they need this and richard uranium for? the other things that have gone the assassinations of nuclear scientists as so on, it definitely could be a factor in suggesting that they might slowdown. i do not think that they will give up their determination to have a program meant to say that they have a right to the program. that is a nationalistic issue. that will let go away. >> that is a lesson not just for the iran, but for the entire middle east. >> it could really be a counter- proliferation -- if it is a horrible cause for the japanese, but it is important for all of the the country to want nuclear power. >> with afghanistan being a majority pest
is the highest with about 38%. i think only japan is higher. it is all put this on an impact. will you comment on that? >> you are correct. our tax rate look soon to be the highest. ia good tax code would have a broad base. this speciallot deductions and extensions. by getting a broad base coming you can lower the rate. that provides greater incentives for firms to locate. do you tax based only on profits earned in the united states are blow for profit? but at what rate to you think we should aim for that would put this in the best position in terms of competition on the global stage? >> i did not have a single number in mind. there are is the number of deductio. we will certainly get it down if we can. >> part of the charges to keep prices stable. on the one hand, we have to pay down the debt. to what is this a faulted the economy? it is still volatil or week. athere is a $1 billion cut we passed around. why is the discrepancy in the figure of around 6005000 to 700? that is a huge difference. who doou believe here? we have a number of questions. we are trying to understand the reasons. >> wou
force trust fund and there are other mechanisms, as well. japan, as an example funds the salaries of the national police, a very significant contribution. so continuing that and increasing that is hugely important. the very high levels of afghan national security force funding right now are, of course, necessary because we're building them. and it requires the infrastructure equipment, in some cases various contract trainers and other contract assistance. these are the big cost drivers, actually, not salaries per se. so once the infrastructure is built and then it is in the sustainment mode rather than the construction mode, costs will come down. obviously as equipment has procured. the element of that cost will come down. as afghan trainers take over for contract trains, that cost will come down. it will still be considerable. and secretary gates talked about that. and certainly over time, afghanistan itself as it is able, again, to exploit its extraordinary mineral blessings, the trillions with an "s" on the end of it of dollars. as they are able to extract and get those to mark
and japan. these were total wars on the conditions of total defeat. in the age of post em -- imperial empires, they do not bow down. the most extraordinary and bizarre statement ever made in contemporary was rumsfeld shock and awe. we had shock people and from that they will bow down and consent. what makes the new arab revolutions difference -- different is these were from below. with the international or national conditions. here you had the extraordinary pressure on local economies and arab economies, rising commodity prices, rising food prices, which impacted directly on the dire and stance of living. at the same time, you have a hugely young population wired together more than before with rising expectations. an educational system that works and turned out educated people and educated people driving buses. nothing wrong with driving buses, but finding the roles and occupations lower than the expectations that they have. this produces the blow. that seems to be historicically creates greater conditions for the democracy than anything that the britain or america were trying to do i
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